layover shingle roofing

Most Common Places For Roof Leaks

Roof leaks are a common annoyance for homeowners. As soon as you see the signs of one (like discolored or damp walls and ceilings), the first step to take is to try to find the source of the leak. If it turns out to be something easy to fix, you can sometimes tackle the repair yourself.

  1. Around the chimney. The flashing around the chimney is a prime source of leaks. Flashing covers up a fairly large gap between the chimney and the roof, and it tends to pull away from the brick over time or rust. This is generally pretty easy to spot, so you’ll be able tell quickly if that’s where your leak originates.
  2. Problem shingles. The shingles on your roof can get damaged when they’re very old or when there’s been a big storm. When water gets past the shingles, it can seep into the underlayment and sheathing, which can then cause leaks inside the home. Look for signs like loose granules, curling or buckling shingles, or obvious missing spots.
  3. Gutters. Has it been a while since you’ve cleaned out the gutters? When they’re clogged or damaged, standing water can back up and cause leaks. The water can also freeze in the gutter and cause a multitude of other problems, so it’s very important to clean out your gutters regularly even if you don’t suspect leaks.
  4. Valleys. When two planes of your roof intersect, the line where they meet is called a valley. Depending on where you live, this could be covered with flashing, rolled roofing, or something else. Water collects in these lows spots, so any problem with the covering will often allow water into the house.
  5. Around ice dams. Even if your roof is great shape, ice dams can cause leaking. These ridges of ice that form at the edge of roofs catches melted snow and doesn’t allow it to run off like it should. This backed-up water can cause major leaks.
  6. Vents, pipes, and other roof penetrations. Anywhere there’s an object that protrudes above your roof, there’s a potential for leaks. Check the flashing around these objects for rust or loose spots.

If you go through the most common spots for roof leaks and can’t find anything, but you’re sure you have a leak, then it’s time to call in a professional. Don’t wait—even a small delay can make a leak worse and a fix much more complicated.

What Is Flashing And Why Is It Important?

Your roof is one of the first barriers of defense against the elements when it comes to your home or business.  Flashing is an essential part of your roof system.

When installed correctly, it is essential in preventing water intrusion at various locations on your roof.

What is flashing?

The protective seal that prevents water intrusion at areas such as skylights, chimneys, dormers and vents is called flashing.  Flashing is a critical preventive measure for moisture damage when water is most prone to penetrate a roof’s surface.

Where is flashing important?

Flashing is important at all roof penetrations, including edges, valleys, joints and any grooves, gaps, intersections and projections on the roof of any structure.

How can improper flashing damage my roof?

Poor or improper flashing can lead to premature deterioration at roof joints, so it is imperative to have flashing installed correctly when a new roof is installed.  Having it done right the first time is one of the best things you can do to preserve your investment.

happy thanksgiving

Happy Thanksgiving! Employee Spotlight.

Happy Holidays to all our friends and clients! We here at Five Points Roofing are wishing you the best of the season and many more to come!

Today we want to highlight one of our long term employees that’s been here for over 4 years, Mike Cates!

Mike is one of our top Project Managers and is a HAAG certified roofer. Mike has been taking over some of our recent projects and is highly proficient in operating a drone to both inspect and ensure the safety of our employees. He is an avid camper and loves to canoe when the summer rolls back around. Here’s to Mike! If you see on your next project, be sure to say hello!

Call us today to schedule a free roof evaluation and estimate (615) 645-2055.

roof with hail damage

FAQ: Hail Damage Repair

Today we’re going to talk about hail and your roof. With all the storms we get yearly in the Middle Tennessee area many of them have pockets of hail. Hail can be devastating on a roof and the hail storm damage can be severe enough to dislodge granules from the surface of the shingles. In spots large enough to expose the asphalt will leave a roof has compromised. This isn’t always the case though, as damage can go unseen, especially from the ground.

The colored granules which are placed on the surface of the shingle provides an aesthetically pleasing product as well as protection to the underlying asphalt from sun exposure which results in deterioration. This is why a hail-damaged roof will tend to fail prematurely.

When indentations/surface damage of the shingle are not visible, we always look for indentations on vents, ridge vents, siding, or any other softer metal objects that may show impact. The effects on the shingle may not be apparent for about a year. At this time, circular areas of granules will fall off the shingle. This is often called spalling. What has occurred is that the impact of the hailstone has broken or weakened the bond between the granules and the asphalt.

After a year or so of weathering, the granules fall off the shingle in the circular area of impact. With granules missing, the sunlight (UV) quickly attacks the asphalt and the maximum performance of the shingle has been compromised. The results of a hailstorm will void the shingles manufacturer’s warranty, as they cannot warranty against “Acts of God” such as hailstorms. That is why it’s necessary to deal with hail damage before it becomes a bigger problem.

Experts agree hail damage is a necessary and critical roof repair. The points below detail how hail damage can progress.

  • The shingles hit by hail have loosened the bond with the granules to the asphalt layer. While you cannot see this from the ground the loosened granules will often end up where your gutters drain. If you see a large accumulation of granules after hail you should have your roof inspected.
  • Once the granules fall off the damaged areas of the shingles, the sun’s ultraviolet light can weaken the exposed spots and make them brittle. In the winter, the shingle expands and contracts and can curl and crack after being weakened by hail. The exposed areas are then very susceptible to leaks and wind damage.
  • Storm and weather related damages have different characteristics as it passes through the seasons. Thus, an inspector can tell whether the damage is new or older. Insurance claim periods can vary but typically there is a set amount of time a home owner can make a claim after the damage occurs – whether you were aware of the damage or not. Aspen has detailed maps showing where and when areas received significant hail damage to roof, that can be useful to help pinpoint the damage date.
  • Once leaks occur, the damage can be extensive due to potential damage from mold, electrical issues, ceiling and wall damage from water and perhaps even personal property losses. The damage can also come very quickly and often is not initially detected.

If you’ve ever had hail in your area, it’s imperative to get a professional roof inspection by an local, established roofer. Our family here at Five Points Roofing have been serving the Nashville, Murfreesboro, Franklin, Brentwood and entire Middle Tennessee market for decades and we’re here to ensure your roof is in good shape and ready for whatever weather is thrown at it.

Call us today to schedule a hail damage evaluation and estimate (615) 645-2055.

contractors license

Some Good Roofing Questions

We get asked questions by curious homeowners all the time. Should I go with a different contractor for a significantly lower price?  Can I save money by buying my own materials?  Should I try to repair the roof on my own?

With any investment, such as your home, you really should weigh your options before making major decisions on how to maintain it.  Avoid these pitfalls when making decisions on how to preserve your roof.

  1. Starting a major roof repair or replacement by yourself (if you are inexperienced).

Unless you have extensive roofing knowledge, it’s probably best to leave the roof work to the professionals.  Tearing off a roof is dangerous and difficult work.  We have often been called in to “rescue” homeowner from a project that they began but soon realized they were in over their heads.  The mistake is often made in an effort to save a few dollars, however, this can cause more damage and cost more in the long run.  With the proper safety equipment, knowledge and skill level, a certified roofing contractor is the way to go.

  1. Buying your own materials.

Shopping around for the best deal is a good thing, but when it comes to having a roof system installed, it pays to allow a qualified contractor with a competitive price to purchase the materials for you.  Not only do you avoid having incorrect quantities or products, the contractor may also have access to better, more competitive pricing due to established relationships with regular suppliers.  A roof installation tends to be a package deal and a good contractor will be able to provide a workmanship and manufacturer’s warranty with your system.

  1. Installing a product that does more damage than good over time.

Not all products are good products for your roof.  Contrary to popular belief, rain diverters can actually cause more damage than good, forcing water to back up under shingles, resulting in costly damage.  Another product that can ultimately cause problems are flush mounted skylights.  They typically don’t have a very wide flange and therefore tend to be unable to support high volumes of water.  Under heavy rain, water can go beyond the flange and penetrate beneath the roof, resulting in leaks.  Rely on a qualified contractor to help you decide what products will perform best for your roof.

  1. Not hiring a solid contractor.

Make sure that you do your homework.  Find a reputable contractor to perform work on your home. Sometimes price isn’t the only factor to consider when it comes to the service you are receiving.  Talk to friends, family and co-workers about a roofing company in your area that has a good name in the community, competitive pricing and a track record of quality work.   Check the Better Business Bureau, online reviews, and see if there is a company website for a feel and feedback on the contractor’s work history.  You want a company with integrity and a great finished product – it is absolutely worth the extra time.

Give us a call here at Five Points Roofing if you have questions, we’ll be happy to answer them.

fall leaves

Why You Should Replace Your Roof In The Fall

With winter in Nashville just around the corner, you may be noticing some issues with your current roofing system. From missing shingles to ceiling leaks, you might just now be realizing that you need to replace that roof.

But can you replace a roof in the fall or winter? This is a great question that we get every year from Tennessee homeowners. The fact is that you yes, you CAN replace your roof, but it’s important to use proper technique from start to finish. This way you can ensure that your roof performs at peak condition at every season.

These are the best techniques that professional roofing contractors use for winter roof installation:

What’s the Best Temperature for Roof Installation?

In an ideal world, asphalt roof shingles should be installed between 40 degrees and 85 degrees Fahrenheit. Even high quality asphalt shingles can crack when hammered, and installing in the wrong temperature can promote breakage. This is one of the biggest problems when you install asphalt shingles when it’s under 40 degrees.

With that said, winter is often a great time to get a good deal on a new roof, however we will need to wait until the temperature is in the right range before scheduling an installation date.

Top Troubles of Roofing Installation in the Winter

 

Aside from asphalt shingles becoming brittle in the winter, there is another important reason as to why it’s important to wait for the right temperature.  Any ideas? It’s all about adhesive! When the temperature drops below 40 degrees, some self-adhesive shingles have a hard time sticking. The sealing strips typically have no trouble bonding in the spring and summer, but in the winter we need to wait until the temperature is higher.

If you choose another type of roofing aside from asphalt, you’re not necessarily out of the woods. Fiberglass shingles are very susceptible to fracturing in the winter, and shakes can also break apart as temperatures approach the freezing mark.

If I Waited Till Winter, Can I Still Replace My Roof?

Despite a handful of obstacles that come along with winter roofing installation, winter is still a perfectly acceptable time to replace your roof, and as mentioned before, the best deals are often offered as the roofing business slows down.

In addition, we use numerous techniques to ensure that your new roof isn’t impacted by cold temperatures.

Keeping Your Roofing Shingles Warm

One of the first steps is to make sure the roofing shingles are warm before they’re installed. This is as simple as storing them in a heated garage or warehouse before delivering to the homeowner.

Properly Sealing the Shingles

In addition to keeping the shingles warm, it’s also important to use proper technique for sealing shingles in the winter. Most roofing shingles are designed with thermally-activated asphalt sealant. This bonds the shingles to the roof using sunlight, and it can take up to a couple weeks for the shingles to completely stick.

The approach is a bit different in the winter, where sunlight can sometimes be a bit scarce. In the winter time, a professional roofing contractor may choose to hand-seal the shingles with an approved asphalt roofing cement or other adhesive that’s provided by the manufacturer. Every tab should be sealed with one or two dabs (roughly 1-inch in diameter) of asphalt roofing cement. The cement should be near the shingle’s edges, but never exposed.

Rakes and eaves are two of the most susceptible areas for wind blowing shingles off the roof. Use a lot of care in this area and be sure that each shingle has the proper amount of sealant for best results.

What About Winter Roof Maintenance?

Even if you don’t intend to replace your entire roof this winter, your roof still may require maintenance. Be very careful about walking over shingles when it’s cold, since they can easily break under the weight of your foot—especially if the shingles are located on an uneven surface or they’re slightly curved.

Activity on your roof may also break the sealant bond on the shingles, so be prepared to hand-seal shingles that are peeling away from your roof.

If you have any questions regarding a new roof replacment, now is the time, feel free to initiate a chat with us online or give us a call at (615) 794-4001.

white house with shingle roofing

Common Roofing Terms You Should Know

Like any technical profession, roofing has a language all its own, and that language involves words unfamiliar to most people. It’s important for homeowners to familiarize themselves with some common roofing terms if they’re considering roof repair or replacement. This way they can communicate effectively with roofing professionals and express concerns when they have them.

Basic Parts of a Roof

Sheathing: Boards made from wood or another material that are secured to the rafters and used as a base for the rest of the roof covering. Also called a deck.

Felt: A fibrous material that’s used as a layer underneath the outermost surface of the roof. Also called underlayment.

Flashing: Pieces of durable metal used for weatherproofing. Flashing is applied around projections and in places where there’s an intersection between two sections to funnel water toward the gutters.

Covering: This refers to the felt plus the outer layer (which may be shingles, metal, slate, or tile).

Drainage: These are the features that allow water to drain off and can include the roof’s shape, its slope, and the way it’s laid out.

Structural Features

Ridge: The angle at the top of a sloped roof, where the two sides meet to form a peak.

Valley: The angle that’s formed when two downward sloping roof sections meet. Valleys can be tricky in terms of placing shingles and flashing, but experienced contractors know how to get this done properly.

Eaves: The bottom edges of the roof that hang over the exterior walls.

Fascia: Boards mounted on an exposed rafter end or at the top of an exterior wall to protect from the elements.

Repair/Replacement Terminology

Bond: The method that’s used to secure the shingles or other covering to each other. There are many different types of bonds, including cross, broken, and staggered.

Nesting: A method of re-roofing that involves laying new shingles over the top of the old shingles in a specific pattern.

Normal Slope Application: This is when shingles are applied to a roof with an average degree of incline (the slope or pitch). Pitch is generally expressed with two numbers which indicate the number of inches the roof rises vertically for every 12 horizontal inches.

As with any situation when you hire contractors, don’t be afraid to ask questions if your roofer starts talking about things you don’t understand. You might feel awkward for a moment or two, but that’s a small price to pay for being on the same page.

white house with black shingle roofing

Asphalt Architectural Shingles

A short post today, we’ll just discuss asphalt architectural shingles and what they are compared to standard 3 tab shingles. Most of us know what an asphalt shingle roof is. It is an asphalt steep slope residential and commercial roof covering. You see them on most homes and on many commercial buildings. They have always been popular because they are cost effective, perform well, and they last 20 plus years. Because of these reasons they are right now the steep slope roof work horse. In other words, they are driving the market.

We’re talking about architectural or “dimensional ” asphalt shingles. The price gap has closed much between them and 3 – tab shingles , which are a lesser product in every way so architectural shingles are really coming on strong. The bottom line is, the architectural shingle looks better, performs better, lasts longer, is heavier, and has a much higher wind warranty.

 

4 Questions To Ask When Replacing A Roof

Don’t let all the different roofing options available go over your head.

Don’t put off thinking about a new roof until it’s too late and there’s water dripping into the living room. With so many roofing options available, it can be easy to feel like you’re in over your head and overwhelmed with choice. Read more

white house with grey shingle roofing

Roof Designs and Styles

Sometimes we like to link over to other websites because we believe the content is rich and engaging and has lots of good information regarding a specific roofing topic. In this case we like this slideshow over at Better Homes and Gardens magazine. Check it out below to see some cool examples of roof design and different roofing styles.

http://www.bhg.com/home-improvement/exteriors/roofs/roof-designs-styles/#page=1